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What we do


About Us

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What we do


About Us


What we do 

Our work makes it easier for people to walk and cycle. This includes where cycling and walking are part of longer journeys using public transport.

We use our skills in behaviour change, community engagement and changing the built environment across our three areas of focus:

  • Connecting people and places
  • Creating liveable neighbourhoods
  • Transforming the school run and commutes


Connecting People and Places

We will develop routes that provide an easy way to get to and from places, as well as safe journeys across them.

The National Cycle Network provides people-friendly routes enjoyed by millions. We will focus on quality, inspiring, memorable routes, which provide opportunities for confidence-building trips.

We will work in challenging urban spaces to join up communities and provide safe, convenient trips to school, work, or the shops. We’ll use our skills in route assessment, collaborative design and construction.  

We will take children and adults out on routes and provide information and guidance. We’ll work with communities to ensure that the routes serve their needs.

How will we measure success?

We will monitor our progress in this area by tracking and reporting:

  • The progress we make in reviewing the National Cycle Network, rolling out a strategic improvement plan and delivering a Network that is recognised for its quality
  • The total number of kilometers of new or improved cycling and walking routes where we’ve contributed to their feasibility, design or delivery

The National Cycle Network

Our vision is of a UK-wide Network of safe, traffic-free routes connecting and crossing settlements and countryside, and inspiring a new generation to get on their bikes.

The National Cycle Network is Sustrans’ longest-running project, born in 1995. It’s one of the reasons so many volunteers and supporters join us.

Like any network, the National Cycle Network has its challenges. However, unlike other transport networks, it is a people’s network, coordinated and largely promoted by us.

We want the National Cycle Network to:

  • Offer continuous routes connecting all our regions and nations
  • Connect and cross countryside, attractions and railway stations
  • Be safe and inspiring for families, leisure, and beginner cyclists
  • Provide gold-standard traffic-free sections


Creating liveable neighbourhoods

Our surroundings have a big impact on the way we live: how active we are, how well we know our neighbours, our overall wellbeing.

We will work with communities to reclaim their streets, transforming them into lively, community-centred neighbourhoods that are safer and easier to travel through on foot and by bike.

Five out of six trips begin or end at home, so we will work where people live. We’ll bring together the knowledge of residents with our design expertise. We’ll facilitate conversations between communities and local authorities.

 

We will use our skills in planning, engagement and engineering to create these people-friendly places, which support local business and attract visitors and investment.

We will ensure that cycling and walking isn’t an afterthought in new developments. We’ll use our skills and knowledge to plan new infrastructure that promotes sustainable, active journeys.

How will we measure success?

We will monitor our progress in this area by tracking and reporting:

  • The number of residents we’ve worked with on developing and implementing schemes that have made their neighbourhoods safer and easier to travel around on bike and foot, and the impact these schemes have had on their quality of life
  • The number of new developments and redevelopments where we’ve influenced the design so they are attractive for cycling and walking

Transforming the school run and commutes

We will help the next generation to discover the joy of cycling and walking, develop better routes for them to use, and encourage support from their parents and communities.

Pupils who walk and cycle arrive at school more alert than those who travel by car.

The average primary school journey is just 1.6 miles. Yet, one in four cars on the road during morning rush hour are on the school run and one quarter of primary schools are in areas that breach the legal limits for nitrogen dioxide. This pollutant stunts children’s growth and increases the risk of asthma and lung cancer.

People are put off cycling and walking if they don’t feel safe. We will help commuters build confidence and improve the infrastructure they use.

We will support employees to walk or cycle to work and help workplaces to see the benefits this brings in improving productivity, reducing days lost to illness and saving business costs, such as parking spaces.

How will we measure success?

We will monitor our progress in this area by tracking and reporting:

  • The number of schools and school children we’ve worked with to increase the number of active journeys to school
  • The number of employees and organisations we’ve worked with to increase the number of active commutes to work
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Our Finances

Over the past five financial years Sustrans has made an average surplus of £160K from an average income of £58M. The largest surplus was £688K and the largest deficit £560K. This consistent year on year financial performance leaves Reserves of £9.9M at March 2017, and the organisation is budgeting for a break-even year to March 2018.

Financial performance across the UK shows significant variation, due to the variety of funding available for our work. A reduction in the funding available in England outside of London over recent years was the principle driver behind a significant restructure through 2016. Sustrans full time equivalent staff numbers peaked at 570 in 2015, and in March 2017 they stand at 446.

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